American Salon February 2013 : Page 78

Private Eye The radiant curves of the 1940s femme fatale come to life in The Art of Intrigue, a new collection by Redken Artist Matthew Tyldesley. Paying homage to vintage hairstyles, old detective lms and Hollywood glamour is The Art of Intrigue, the newest collection from Redken Artist Matthew Tyldesley of New Attitude Hair Salon in Louisville, KY. “I love vintage pin curls and roller set techniques from the past,” Tyldesley says. “I really wanted to honor that technical aspect to hairdressing. There was such a level of dedication and time devoted to achieving the classic 1940s looks.” Tyldesley and his team brought to life the likes of Veronica Lake and Hedy Lamarr by prepping the hair with Redken Hot Sets 22 Thermal Setting Mist before creating voluptuous curls using various techniques with a 1-inch Marcel iron. —Jolene Turner 78 American Salon Februar y 2013 PHOTOGRAPHY: JOSHUA ESKRIDGE PHOTOGRAPHY; MAKEUP: ISIDRO VALENCIA; FASHION STYLING: GENNA YUSSMAN To achieve these waves, hair was parted in the middle and prepped with Redken Hot Sets 22 Thermal Setting Mist before it was curled with a 1-inch Marcel iron in 1-inch sections. The curls were then set by pinning them at to the head and spritzing the hair with Fashion Works 12. Once the curls cooled, the pins were released and the hair was lightly combed out using a wide-toothed comb. A misting of Forceful 23 held the look in place.

Style File

American Salon staff

Private Eye<br /> <br /> The radiant curves of the 1940s femme fatale come to life in The Art of Intrigue, <br /> a new collection by Redken Artist Matthew Tyldesley.<br /> <br /> Paying homage to vintage hairstyles, old detective films and Hollywood glamour is The Art of Intrigue, the newest collection from Redken Artist Matthew Tyldesley of New Attitude Hair Salon in Louisville, KY. “I love vintage pin curls and roller set techniques from the past,” Tyldesley says. “I really wanted to honor that technical aspect to hairdressing. There was such a level of dedication and time devoted to achieving the classic 1940s looks.” Tyldesley and his team brought to life the likes of Veronica Lake and Hedy Lamarr by prepping the hair with Redken Hot Sets 22 Thermal Setting Mist before creating voluptuous curls using various techniques with a 1-inch Marcel iron. —Jolene Turner<br /> <br /> <br /> Modern <br /> Classics<br /> <br /> Classic ’dos get a splash of modern style and extra pizzazz in the latest collection from Trevor Sorbie Artistic Team member Adam Szabo.<br /> <br /> Timeless, the newest collection by Trevor Sorbie’s Adam Szabo, puts a twist on beauty’s classic approaches to hairstyling, adding edgy elements for a more current flair. “I created new, unique hairstyles and also used classic techniques with some modern takes on them to achieve timeless beauty,” says Szabo, who updated traditional styles such as the ponytail and bob with soft edges and sleek design. “There isn’t one specific inspiration behind this collection,” Szabo says. “It’s inspired by everything and anything that came into sight this year.” —Kristen Heinzinger <br /> <br /> <br /> City Slickers<br /> <br /> Glossy radiance glows in sublime, subtle styles in the Purity collection from British hairdresser Christopher Appleton.<br /> <br /> Hailing from the United Kingdom, hairdresser Christopher Appleton has created the Purity collection inspired by stylish women who take the latest trends from the runways and translate them into this season’s greatest hair looks. Sleek ponies and simple yet exquisite updos reign supreme. The styles perfectly evoke Appleton’s vision of creating gorgeous, sexy, real hair. “I wanted Purity to be an enticing collection with voluptuous volume and shimmering sexuality,” Appleton says. “Each style embodies catwalk style, but also wearable style—a look most women aspire to have.” —Jolene Turner <br /> <br /> Twisted Sisters<br /> A swirling cultural collision of color and playfulness, Kaleidoscope is<br /> the newest collection created by Minneapolis-based Haus Salon.<br /> Polka dots, candy colors and waves converge in Minneapolis-based Haus Salon’s new collection,<br /> Kaleidoscope. Led by Haus Creative Director Charlie Brackney and Color Director Mark<br /> DeBolt, the team—Nikki Brown, Susie Carlson, Caitlin Dvorak, Natalie Hansen, Jill Miller and<br /> Marlee Southam—fashioned looks inspired by the graphic arts, British hairdressing and Japanese<br /> modernist art. “The collection highlights the synergy of global connectedness and cultures merging,<br /> as represented by swirling circles of color,” Brackney says. “The palettes and patterns of Yayoi<br /> Kusama and Haruki Murakami were married with silhouettes and textures from classic English and<br /> American hairdressing to evoke a never-before-seen vision of beauty.” —Jolene Turner

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